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The Old Aerial Photos Legal Pack is proving to be a real winner among the legal profession, particularly in relation to boundary disputes and adverse possession. The pack contains all the photographic evidence you need to prove your boundary or land ownership issue.  The OAP pack contains a scanned and authenticated historical aerial photo of your choice, and print of an up to date photo as well as the historical photo. The authentication means that the photograph can be used of legal purposes in court. Additional historical aerial photos can be added for an extra fee.  These packs can be purchased on the OAP website www.oldaerialphotos.com or by calling 01530 518528.

If you require advice as to how an old aerial photo can help in legal cases, or if you require interpretation or even an expert witness, please contact our experts on 01530 518528.  The Old Aerial Photos service is run by Bluesky International Limited.

Following an exclusive agreement between aerial survey specialist Bluesky and Getmapping the original images that make up the Millennium Map will now be available fromwww.oldaerialphotos.com. Billed at the time as a modern day equivalent of the Domesday Book the Millennium Map was the first commercial countrywide survey and is credited with the popularisation of aerial photography with reader offers in daily newspapers and reports that the Queen had invested in the company.

The 120,000 images cover the whole of England and Wales, and parts of Scotland, at a resolution of 25cm with selected cities at up to 10cm resolution and date from 1999 to 2001. The agreement will also see Bluesky take delivery of the original aerial survey films that will be held at their secure archive facility in Leicestershire.

“As some of these images are more than ten years old their inclusion on the Old Aerial Photos website, the home of historical aerial photography in the UK, seemed an obvious addition to existing sales channels,” commented Pete Bonham, Business Manager at Getmapping. “By storing the original films at Bluesky’s dedicated archive centre we are also helping to preserve them for future generations.”

“Having been part of the team that created the Millennium Map we are delighted that an agreement has been made to allow them to be stored at the Bluesky offices with other important archives,” commented Rachel Tidmarsh, Managing Director of Bluesky. “By moving the original films to archive facility we can speed up the order fulfilment process and ensure they are stored in the optimum conditions for longevity.”

Visitors to http://www.oldaerialphotos.com can already search through over a million aerial photos dating back as far as 1917 by simply entering a postcode, address or grid reference. Detailed search results, including the age and ground coverage, of every image that matches the search criteria are displayed and the visitor can choose to purchase a hard copy print, digital image file or money saving photopack.

Photos that are available to purchase from http://www.oldaerialphotos.com include some of the very earliest commercial aerial survey images, military photography from World War II and many national archives. Offering a record of most major UK cities and towns, transport and utility infrastructure and commercial property developments, the images are an invaluable resource for anyone with a personal or professional interest in local studies, genealogy, boundary disputes, environmental land use research or town planning.

We have just added another 15000 photo details to the OldAerialPhotos.com website. These are all black and white and taken in the 1980s and early 1990s.  They cover Cornwall, Norfolk, Cardiff, Tyne and Wear, Cleveland, Manchester and Liverpool.  Some are at a very high scale of 1:3000, so will offer unprecedented detail. For more details please visit the Old Aerial Photos website, which offers almost 2 million historical aerial photos of the UK.  You can now order a preview of almost all of the photos online!

We have recently been working on a boundary dispute case involving an illegal extension, and much of the case had been built on the ‘evidence’ of Google Earth aerial photos, using the very cool time slider (have a look, it is great!).  But what we thought was an “open and shut case” actually ended up being far more complicated, because of the Google Earth data.  The dispute was in an area in London where there are several date of aerial photography available.  The 2003 photo showed no extension, but the 2006 photo showed it – sounds simple enough until you view the 1999 and 2002 photo, both of which clearly show the extension. One might assume it was demolished and rebuilt, but the answer is far simpler.  the 2003 photo was in fact taken in 2001.  To compound the problem it was claimed the extension was built in 2001, so why was it on the 1999 photo?  It transpires that the 1999 photo is the same aerial photo as the 2002 photo, which is dated correctly.  Confused…we were!

If you go to Google Earth and find the Gherkin in Central London then open the time slider you can watch the tower going through various stages of construction, in the wrong order!  Google Earth and  Bing Maps are fantastic resources and we have all lost hours just cruising around the globe looking for past holiday destinations and where our grandparents lives. But be aware that the dates and other information offered by Google (and Bing) are not always to be relied on.  The detail within the photos can also have been altered in the process of putting the data together; Photoshop is an amazing tool…so be warned!  Use Google Earth (and Google Maps for what they are intended, which is not legal disputes!

Our advice is to always use aerial photos from a source that can verify the photo for you. www.oldaerialphotos.com is the obvious place as we have the most on offer!

More than 100,000 aerial photographs have been added to the Old Aerial Photos online collection of historically important images following an agreement with Land & Property Services (Northern Ireland) to supply the entire Ordnance Survey of Northern Ireland (OSNI) photographic archive. The newly available archive includes complete countrywide coverage from 2002 onwards together with a vast array of mainly urban areas dating back to the 1950’s. With scales ranging from 1:20,000 up to 1:3,000 visitors to www.oldaerialphotos.com will be able to view and download images to help with boundary or property disputes, site investigation, historical research or genealogical studies.

“We hope that this agreement will encourage greater uptake and use of our vast historical archive,” commented Philip Goss, Copyright and Contract Manager at Land & Property Services. “Bluesky, who manage Old Aerial Photos, has an excellent reputation as an experienced supplier of historical imagery and already hold the largest archive of historical imagery in the UK. This agreement will build on this position and will further help Bluesky grow their immense archive making them a one stop shop for aerial photography in Britain and Northern Ireland.” Philip added, “Aerial photography was first used as a source for mapping information in 1958 following a decision to create a new map reference system, the Irish Grid, which would enable seamless coverage of the Country, More recently air photography has also been used for the generation of various products including orthophotography, a seamless detailed scaled photograph of Northern Ireland.”

Visitors to www.oldaerialphotos.com can already search through more than a million aerial photos dating back as far as 1917 by simply entering a postcode, address or grid reference. Detailed search results, including the age and ground coverage, of every image that matches the search criteria are displayed and the visitor can choose to purchase either a hard copy print or digital image file.

Photos that are available to purchase from http://www.oldaerialphotos.com include some of the earliest commercial aerial survey images, military photography from World War II and many national archives. Offering a record of most major UK cities and towns, transport and utility infrastructure and commercial property developments, the images are an invaluable resource for anyone with a personal or professional interest in local studies, genealogy, boundary disputes, environmental land use research or town planning.

 

Here is some useful advice on boundary disputes from Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors, taken from their free guide booklet.  Certainly worth reading if you have a boundary dispute. Full link to the original document is at the bottom of this blog.
What is a boundary?

Land Registry records the general position of the boundaries in each registered title using an adapted large scale Ordnance Survey plan.This title plan may not accurately represent the true ground positions of the boundaries. The Land Registration Act 2002 allows you under certain conditions to determine and record the exact line of your boundaries on a registered title, to avoid any future boundary dispute. But what happens, for instance, if a neighbour complains a new wall is overlapping their land, or their new extension takes up part of a pathway between your houses? A minor disagreement can quickly become a full-scale dispute involving solicitors’ letters and threats of court action. Even more damaging are the costs involved. Ultimately, the cost of protecting your right to land in court could be 50 or 100 times as much, so it pays to think hard before rushing into legal action.

What should you do?

Get a specialist to look at all aspects of the problem and advise on whether or not you have a case. Chartered surveyors specialising in boundaries are professional advisors with relevant knowledge of both property issues and the law. They will look at the problem, prepare any technical data that may help solve the dispute at an early stage and, if necessary, provide a court with the appropriate advice and information needed to make a judgement. They will also advise on alternative dispute resolution procedures, which would avoid the need to go to court.

Accurately identifying the boundary

Accurately identifying the boundary between two properties often requires specialist knowledge. The red line drawn around a property on the Land Registry plan only shows the general boundary. It does not identify whether the boundary runs along the centre of a hedge or along one side of it. Ordnance Survey maps are equally unreliable because, as part of the mapping process, they do not mark exact property boundaries. So a line surrounding the property is not necessarily the property boundary. A chartered land surveyor will not only survey the land, check deeds and the plans attached to them, but will refer to historical documents and aerial photographs.

A boundary can change over time for many reasons: a diverted water course, or a wooden fence that moves slightly every time it is replaced. The reason for such changes is rarely recorded and can lead to disputes, especially if the owner has lost the right to move the boundary line back to its original position.

Dealing with disputes

The key to resolving a dispute speedily and successfully is to seek expert advice as soon as possible. In the first instance, this advice can be from either a chartered land surveyor or a chartered surveyor specialising in boundary disputes. Before you ask an expert to work on your behalf, check the following:

• Do they specialise in boundary work?

• Do they have experience of mapping and land surveys?

• Are they skilled at interpreting aerial photographs?

• Are they familiar with the latest civil procedure rules and experienced in preparing reports for court?

• Do they have experience as an expert witness in court and, if so, how many court appearances have they made in the last year?

If you can settle the matter before going to court, or if the court defines a boundary line and writes an order, the chartered land surveyor will mark out your boundary line. They may supervise any fencing or building contractors to make sure there are no further arguments. Ensure they prepare a new plan, to the required specification, showing the agreed boundary line for submission to the Land Registry as a determined boundary

Call the RICS Boundary disputes helpline

0870 333 1600

The helpline will put you in touch with an experienced local RICS member who will provide you with up to 30 minutes free advice.

RICS Neighbour Dispute Service

Call +44 (0)20 7334 3806

Fax +44 (0)20 7334 3802

Email drs@rics.org

The RICS Dispute Resolution Service (DRS) provides access to a specialist panel of expert Chartered Surveyors with experience of resolving neighbourly boundary disputes. This can involve expert determination of the boundary and mediation of a dispute. Therefore, you do have an alternative to formal litigation if any doubt or uncertainly exists between parties on the correct boundary line.

The full booklet can be found on the RICS Website

Cutting down hedges, planting trees and moving fences often give rise to boundary disputes. They are the most frequent cause of bad feelings between neighbours although most of the time they can be resolved quickly and cheaply.  Here are three steps taken from boundrydisputes.org, who can provide some of the documents needed when involved in a boundary dispute.  Remember that www.oldaerialphotos.com have the largest collection of aerial photos available for helping with boundary dispute resolution.

Step 1 Title Deeds: An eminent Judge of the House of Lords has recently stated that an examination of the title deeds is the first port of call. You cannot even begin to resolve your dispute without examining all available registered title deeds for each property.

Step 2 Presumptions:  There are certain legal presumptions that apply in the absence of contrary agreement. These must be considered. Any contrary agreement would normally be contained in the title deeds, so the two must be considered together.

Step 3 Aerial Photo:  Aerial photographs of the property should be obtained, if possible, as sometimes it is necessary to examine the position of physical features on the ground and compare them to descriptions in the deeds. It is often preferable to have more than one photo to either back each other up, or show that a boundary has moved.

If necessary:  If the three steps above do not help you settle your dispute you may have to instruct a surveyor, or apply to the court. You will still need several documents however, including the Property Register, Title Plan, all Registered Old Style Deeds, the Lease, as well maps, aerial photos and a list of legal presumptions.

It can be a very upsetting process, and if you need help – we are here.  www.oldaerialphotos.com

Fugro-BKS (formerly BKS Surveys) has signed up as a content provider to Bluesky’s online collection of historically important aerial photographs. Visitors to www.oldaerialphotos.com will now be able to search through thousands of additional unique aerial images from the 1950’s onwards including many complete UK county surveys. The Fugro-BKS images available from OldAerialPhotos also include a significant amount of project specific photographs covering sites in Hampshire, Cornwall, Norfolk, Grampian, Tyne and Wear and Merseyside.

“BKS is a very well known and highly respected name in the aerial survey sector and we are therefore delighted that they have come on board as content providers for the OldAerialPhotos website,” commented James Eddy, Technical Director of Bluesky. “This agreement with Fugro-BKS will further enhance the visitors’ experience providing access to an unprecedented million plus historically important images.”

“OldAerialPhotos provides a fascinating window on the past revealing towns and cities as they have developed over the past fifty plus years,” commented Mervyn Adams, Production Manager of Fugro-BKS. “The addition of our back collection of imagery to the archive will further enhance the potential for historic research and local area studies.”

Fugro-BKS was established in 1956 in Leatherhead, Surrey. The founding shareholders, J.W.Barnby, M.Keegan and R.W. Stevens, gave the company its initials B.K.S. and the company’s main businesses were aerial photography and topographical surveys. In 1965, Fugro-BKS expanded its operation through new offices in Coleraine, Northern Ireland, and in 1967, the Leatherhead production facility was transferred to an enlarged Coleraine unit. In April 2008 BKS joined the Fugro group; based in Holland Fugro has more than 300 operating companies worldwide, providing a range of geotechnical survey and geoscience services.

Visitors to www.oldaerialphotos.com can search through almost million aerial photos dating back as far as 1917 by simply entering a postcode, address or grid reference. Detailed search results, including the age and ground coverage, of every image that matches the search criteria are displayed and the visitor can choose to purchase either a hard copy print or digital image file.

Photos that are available to purchase from www.oldaerialphotos.com include some of the earliest commercial aerial survey images, military photography from the Second World War and many national archives. Offering a record of most major UK cities and towns, transport and utility infrastructure and commercial property developments, the images are an invaluable resource for anyone with a personal or professional interest in local studies, genealogy, boundary disputes, environmental land use research or town planning.

OldAerialPhotos.com is pleased to announce that we are now able to offer you almost 50,000 unique aerial photos that cover Northern Ireland dating back to 1973. They are available both on the online shop and through our sales team (01530 518518, if you prefer the more personal service!).

This is a great step forward for Old Aerial Photos as it gives us coverage of over 99% of the UK! Give us a call now to see if we can help you.

Old Aerial Photos is pleased to announce that another 50,000 will be added to the service very soon. These photos will give us much needed coverage of Northern Ireland, and will give us full UK coverage. We are of course very excited. The photos date from 1973 to up 2007.

More details to follow. check out the website at http://www.oldaerialphotos.com